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Roots and Ramifications Arthur John Knapp

Roots and Ramifications

Arthur John Knapp

Published June 4th 2009
ISBN :
Hardcover
156 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1857 edition. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER VIII. Of WordsMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1857 edition. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER VIII. Of Words Derived From The Greek Language. In many instances we find words purely Greek in common use amongst us. Cholera is simply the Greek word for disease, and the parent of our word choler. Moustache is the Greek word for the upper lip, ixvo-raZ, mustax. Horizon is the Greek ogi uv, orizon, signifying bounding or terminating the sight. Lichen is the Greek word for tree-moss. Cataract is Greek for rushing down, and in that language signified not only a waterfall, but was the name given to a sea-bird from its rushing down upon its prey. Pliny (book x. ch. 43) describes this bird in such a manner, as to leave no doubt but that it was the Solan goose. Paradox is pure Greek, for anything contrary to received opinion- and paralysis is Greek for loosening of the nerves. Our word garret is by our etymologists derived from the French garite, the tower of a citadel- but it seems to me to be the corruption of the Greek xaqa, kara, the head or top of anything. Canopy is the corruption of the Greek Xwvwsteiov, konopeion, from wu-/, konops, a gnat or mosquito, konopeion with the Greeks signifying a tester of a bed for keeping away gnats. We meet with this word in the 10th chap. of Judith, 21, where the passage is in our versions rendered, Now Holofernes rested upon his bed under a canopy --the word passed into the Latin language uncorrupted. Horace uses it in his 9th Epode, v. 16, --Interque Signa turpe militaria Sol aspicit conopeum- and the sun beheld an infamous canopy spread in the midst of our military standards. The Romans borrowed these tents from the Egyptians, where they were used by the ladies to guard them from the mosquitos which infested the Nile. We have corrupted the word into canopy, and have extended...