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Old Instonians: William Thomson, 1st Baron Kelvin, Tim Collins, Joseph Larmor, Thomas Andrews, Brian Mawhinney, Baron Mawhinney, Donal Books LLC

Old Instonians: William Thomson, 1st Baron Kelvin, Tim Collins, Joseph Larmor, Thomas Andrews, Brian Mawhinney, Baron Mawhinney, Donal

Books LLC

Published August 15th 2011
ISBN : 9781155569659
Paperback
28 pages
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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 26. Chapters: William Thomson, 1st Baron Kelvin, Tim Collins, Joseph Larmor, Thomas Andrews, Brian Mawhinney, BaronMorePlease note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 26. Chapters: William Thomson, 1st Baron Kelvin, Tim Collins, Joseph Larmor, Thomas Andrews, Brian Mawhinney, Baron Mawhinney, Donald Currie, J. M. Andrews, John Alexander Sinton, John Laird, Baron Laird, William Purdon, William Pirrie, 1st Viscount Pirrie, James Steele, Dermott Monteith, Bowman Malcolm, Knox Cunningham, Robert Lowry, Baron Lowry, Kenneth Bloomfield, Robert Carswell, Baron Carswell, Maynard Sinclair, Leonard Steinberg, Baron Steinberg, R. B. McDowell, Sir James Andrews, 1st Baronet, Robert James McMordie, James McCann, Christopher Salmon Patterson, Thomas Edward McConnell, James Glencairn Cunningham, Charles Rafter, Maurice Stewart, Daniel Martin Wilson, Norman Laird, David John Little, James McAdam, James Hamilton. Excerpt: William Thomson, 1st Baron Kelvin OM, GCVO, PC, PRS, PRSE, (26 June 1824 - 17 December 1907) was a mathematical physicist and engineer. At the University of Glasgow he did important work in the mathematical analysis of electricity and formulation of the first and second Laws of Thermodynamics, and did much to unify the emerging discipline of physics in its modern form. He worked closely with Mathematics professor, Hugh Blackburn, at the University in his work. He also had a career as an electric telegraph engineer and inventor, which propelled him into the public eye and ensured his wealth, fame and honour. For his work on the transatlantic telegraph project he was knighted by Queen Victoria, becoming Sir William Thomson. He had extensive maritime interests and was most noted for his work on the mariners compass, which had previously been limited in reliability. Lord Kelvin is widely known for realising that there was a lower limit to temperature, absolute zero- absolute temperatures are stated in units of kelvin in his honour. On his ennoblement in honour of his achievements in thermodynami...